Tag Archives: Winnipeg Truck Driving Schools

Women Becoming Commonplace as Professional Drivers

Next time you’re on the road and you happen look in to the cab of a semi –truck, don’t be surprised if you see a smiling woman’s face.  At First Class Training Centre we are excited about the trend of the growing numbers of women choosing to become a professional driver.

First Class Driver Training for Women

The career of a professional driver is rewarding, challenging, and inclusive.  As the North American economy heats up and driver shortages become more critical, the industry is lucky to see more women enter the workforce.

First Class is the leader in Class 1 training for everyone.  Our facilities are bright, modern and welcoming.  We continue to be committed to excellence in everything we do.  If you are interested in driver training in Winnipeg or rural Manitoba, check out First Class and ask a graduate about us.  They’ll tell you that our professionalism, attention to detail and the best instructor to student ratio in the business makes a difference.

Here’s to you for making the right choice for driver education.

The Class in Class 1 at First Class Training Centre

At First Class Training Centre, we like to think that we put the class back into Class 1 Driver Training.  Let’s talk about “class” from 3 different perspectives.

Excellence in Driver Training

1.  Class is where you go to learn.  Our “classes” at First Class offer the some of the best student to teacher ratio in the country.  All of our instructors have years of experience in the trucking industry and our curriculum is industry recognized as one of the best in the business
2.  First Class is really First Class. Everything we do at First Class is done with the highest standards in the industry.  Our facilities in Brandon and Winnipeg are modern and bright, and the equipment you train on is the latest generation tractor trailers.  We also offer the only mobile training centre in Manitoba.   We treat you with respect and have more one on one time than any other truck training provider.
3. It’s about giving you class. We know that you have made a big commitment to get your Class 1 Driver Training through us.   By the time you finish your training, you will have developed the self confidence to be great as a professional driver.  We want you to be proud of your career and build your confidence to be the best you can be.

Back to School is Just Around the Corner – Are You Ready to go back to school for a Career as a Professional Truck Driver?

Many people think of the start of September as the time when kids go back to school.

Maybe you have a young family, and find yourself in a job that doesn’t seem to fit or pay that well.  You’re having trouble to make ends meet.   Maybe it’s time to think of your next career move to start making some real money.

A career as a professional truck driver is rewarding and pays well.  The good news is that there is a definite need for graduates of Class 1 licensing.   Better news is that First Class Driver Training is the most respected and well run training school in the province of Manitoba. First Class Driver Training has offices in Winnipeg and Brandon and offers mobile training to most parts of Manitoba.

First Class Driver Training is the industry leader in driver education in Winnipeg and Manitoba.  Our graduates are successful in finding work all across Canada and the United States. We are PVI accredited and have one of the best teacher to student ratios in the business.

Graduation Rate linked to Job Placement

At First Class Training Centre, our focus is to be the best truck driving and safety training school in Winnipeg, Brandon, Manitoba and Canada.

Excellence in Driver Training

It’s no wonder our graduation rate is one of the best in North America.  Our dedication to being the best helps you to be your best behind the wheel.

It all starts with a dedication to quality in everything we do.  Our instructors are at the top of their game and we have the best instructor to student ratio in the business.  Our equipment is modern, clean and in superb condition.  We also offer the only mobile driver simulator in Manitoba.  At First Class, we create an environment of excellence.

What does this mean for you when you graduate from your Class 1, or Class 3 training?

Simply put, First Class Training is recognized in the industry as one of the premier training centres for driver training.  The trucking industry recognizes our graduates are road ready and can contribute to their organization immediately.

If you are thinking of a career in a big rig, or you are looking to upgrade your truck driving skills, you need to know that First Class Training Centre is the high road to success

What’s in Your Emergency Kit?

Anytime you’re heading out on the highway, there’s a certain amount of emergency preparation you need to do.  If you’re a local delivery trucker driving in good weather, your emergency preparation kit might consist of a fully charged cellphone, some extra snacks and water, and a $20 bill tucked in the back of your wallet.

If you’re a long-haul operator working solo for days at a time, you need considerably more gear in your emergency kit.  And if it’s winter, when the weather can leave you stranded at a moment’s notice, there’s a lot more planning that you need to do.  Here are some suggested items for your emergency bag:
1)    Cellphone and extra battery  – In an emergency, communication can be the difference between life and death.  Make sure your phone operates and that all your batteries are charged.
2)    Food and Water – In winter, take enough with you to last a couple of days.  A dense energy source (granola bars, etc.) and a big jug of water are must0haves.
3)    Extra Clothes and a Blanket – You may be stranded without heat, or you may have to leave your truck.  Make sure you have clothing that’s appropriate for very cold weather.  Don’t forget your hands and feet – extra socks and gloves.
4)    Light and Heat – A candle can provide both if you’re stranded in your truck without heat.
5)    Tools – No need to go overboard, but some basic necessities can get you out of a jam.  Screwdrivers and a small socket set can take care of most immediate needs.

6)    Currency – if the power is out, there’s a good chance you won’t be able to use credit or debit.  In these situations, a little bit of extra cash can go a long way.
At First Class Training Centre, we give aspiring truck drivers the training they need for challenging and rewarding careers in the transportation industry. Contact us online or call Toll Free (1-(855) 632-5302.

Driving After Dark

On the shortest day of the year (Dec 21), Winnipeg has only 8 hours and 5 minutes of daylight.  Because of our northern latitude, the Prairie Provinces have more hours of darkness in the winter than most of North America.

Nighttime driving is far more dangerous than running down the highway in the day.  A combination of reduced visibility, less ability to perceive depth, and fatigue caused by the body’s natural impulse to sleep in the dark make a driver more likely to have an accident after sunset.

Here are some things you can do to increase your safety when driving your truck at night:

Check Equipment

Make sure your lights are working – all of them.  Reflectors, too.  It’s just as important to be seen by other drivers, as it is to see them.  Replace anything that’s not performing properly.  Incandescent headlamps will dim over time – check and replace them periodically, and make sure they’re aimed properly.

Upgrade Headlamps

If you’re an owner/operator, equipment upgrades are up to you.  If your truck’s a bit older, you might want to look at some of the new headlamp systems.  Just resist the urge to light the front of your truck up like a travelling sun, and blind other drivers.

Dim the Lights Inside

Dash lights and accessory lighting should be kept as dim as possible, as illumination inside the cab will interfere with your ability to spot things outside.

Wear the Right Glasses

If you require corrective lenses, anti-reflective coatings can make it easier to see, because they stop light from bouncing around inside your lenses.  Avoid sunglasses or novelty tinted glasses – they’ll cut down on the amount of light that makes it to your retinal, so you’ll actually see less.

Don’t Look into the Lights

When a car approaches, don’t look directly into the headlamps.  Your vision will be affected afterwards.

Find out about a career as a Transport Truck Driver.  At First Class Training Centre in Winnipeg we offer comprehensive training by seasoned professionals.  Call Toll Free 1-855-632-5302.

In the Winnipeg area call 204-632-5302.

Ready Your Truck (and Yourself) for Winter Driving

We all experience trouble getting moving when the weather gets cold.  It feels like winter settles into our systems, and makes us more sluggish.  We don’t want to get out of our nice warm beds and head to work.

It’s a little like that for our trucks, too.  In cold weather (which there is no shortage of on the Canadian prairies), lubricant don’t flow as easily, fuel is reluctant to flow and burn, and moving parts become more brittle and break more easily.

Not only are breakdowns more likely in cold weather, they’re more inconvenient, too.  If you’re an Owner/Operator, there are some things you need to do in order to ready yourself and your vehicle for lower temperatures.

Preventing Winter Problems

Have your truck inspected by a mechanic before the cold weather comes.  It’s much better (and more economical) to fix the problem in a nice warm shop than it is out in the field.

Ensure that your fluids are winter grade (correct oil viscosity, coolant/antifreeze tested and rated for lower temperatures than you expect, and don’t forget to stock up on anti-gelling diesel additive.  It’s cheaper at home than it is on the road, and you’ll always know you have it.  Without it, your truck won’t run in low temperatures.

Equip Yourself

If you drive enough winter kilometers, sooner or later you’re going to be stranded.  Whether you’re snowed in at a rest stop (best place to be in a storm) or broken down in the middle of nowhere, you may need to rely on your survival kit.  Bring plenty of extra blankets, drinking water, non-perishable foods, and a flashlight with batteries.  Candles can provide light and heat in a sub-zero cab.  Also, ensure you’ve got a cellphone with a backup battery and charger with you – communications can be your lifeline in the event of an emergency.

If you want to learn what it takes to be a Transport Truck Driver, visit First Class Training Centre in Winnipeg.  You can visit us online or call Toll Free 1-855-632-5302.

In the Winnipeg area call 204-632-5302.