Monthly Archives: December 2013

Manitoba Metis Federation Inc. Info Session for Class 1 Truck Driver Training

Come join us at our next information session, taking place on January 13th, 2014 at 3pm and 7pm.  Open to all Metis, Non-Status & Inuit Clients.

Click here or Contact us for more information.

A Holiday Greeting from First Class Training Centre

From Jim and the team at First Class Training Centre, we would like to wish you all a very happy holiday season!  2013 was a year of many successes for us, and we are looking forward to another prosperous year in 2014.

We will be closed from December 24th afternoon until January 1st of the new year.  Our school will reopen on Thursday, January 2nd.  We will be starting a new Class 1 training course on January 4th so be sure to sign up for a spot to start the new year off on the right track.  We have limited seating available.

Have a wonderful holiday season and all the best to you and yours!

Driving After Dark

On the shortest day of the year (Dec 21), Winnipeg has only 8 hours and 5 minutes of daylight.  Because of our northern latitude, the Prairie Provinces have more hours of darkness in the winter than most of North America.

Nighttime driving is far more dangerous than running down the highway in the day.  A combination of reduced visibility, less ability to perceive depth, and fatigue caused by the body’s natural impulse to sleep in the dark make a driver more likely to have an accident after sunset.

Here are some things you can do to increase your safety when driving your truck at night:

Check Equipment

Make sure your lights are working – all of them.  Reflectors, too.  It’s just as important to be seen by other drivers, as it is to see them.  Replace anything that’s not performing properly.  Incandescent headlamps will dim over time – check and replace them periodically, and make sure they’re aimed properly.

Upgrade Headlamps

If you’re an owner/operator, equipment upgrades are up to you.  If your truck’s a bit older, you might want to look at some of the new headlamp systems.  Just resist the urge to light the front of your truck up like a travelling sun, and blind other drivers.

Dim the Lights Inside

Dash lights and accessory lighting should be kept as dim as possible, as illumination inside the cab will interfere with your ability to spot things outside.

Wear the Right Glasses

If you require corrective lenses, anti-reflective coatings can make it easier to see, because they stop light from bouncing around inside your lenses.  Avoid sunglasses or novelty tinted glasses – they’ll cut down on the amount of light that makes it to your retinal, so you’ll actually see less.

Don’t Look into the Lights

When a car approaches, don’t look directly into the headlamps.  Your vision will be affected afterwards.

Find out about a career as a Transport Truck Driver.  At First Class Training Centre in Winnipeg we offer comprehensive training by seasoned professionals.  Call Toll Free 1-855-632-5302.

In the Winnipeg area call 204-632-5302.

Ready Your Truck (and Yourself) for Winter Driving

We all experience trouble getting moving when the weather gets cold.  It feels like winter settles into our systems, and makes us more sluggish.  We don’t want to get out of our nice warm beds and head to work.

It’s a little like that for our trucks, too.  In cold weather (which there is no shortage of on the Canadian prairies), lubricant don’t flow as easily, fuel is reluctant to flow and burn, and moving parts become more brittle and break more easily.

Not only are breakdowns more likely in cold weather, they’re more inconvenient, too.  If you’re an Owner/Operator, there are some things you need to do in order to ready yourself and your vehicle for lower temperatures.

Preventing Winter Problems

Have your truck inspected by a mechanic before the cold weather comes.  It’s much better (and more economical) to fix the problem in a nice warm shop than it is out in the field.

Ensure that your fluids are winter grade (correct oil viscosity, coolant/antifreeze tested and rated for lower temperatures than you expect, and don’t forget to stock up on anti-gelling diesel additive.  It’s cheaper at home than it is on the road, and you’ll always know you have it.  Without it, your truck won’t run in low temperatures.

Equip Yourself

If you drive enough winter kilometers, sooner or later you’re going to be stranded.  Whether you’re snowed in at a rest stop (best place to be in a storm) or broken down in the middle of nowhere, you may need to rely on your survival kit.  Bring plenty of extra blankets, drinking water, non-perishable foods, and a flashlight with batteries.  Candles can provide light and heat in a sub-zero cab.  Also, ensure you’ve got a cellphone with a backup battery and charger with you – communications can be your lifeline in the event of an emergency.

If you want to learn what it takes to be a Transport Truck Driver, visit First Class Training Centre in Winnipeg.  You can visit us online or call Toll Free 1-855-632-5302.

In the Winnipeg area call 204-632-5302.